Sexual Violence in Queensland and Australia – Key Facts


Sourced form: Queensland Government - Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women
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General statistics on sexual violence In Australia:

  • 1 in 5 women have been sexually assaulted or threatened since the age of 15.
  • 1 in 2 women aged 15 and over have experienced sexual harassment since the age of 15.
  • 1 in 20 men have been sexually assaulted or threatened since the age of 15.
  • 1 in 4 men aged 18 and over have experienced sexual harassment since the age of 15.
  • 98% of women who have been sexually assaulted said that the perpetrator was a male.
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Personal Safety Survey 2016.

 

In Queensland in 2017:

  • There were 4,751 recorded victims of sexual assault – increasing for the sixth year in a row.
  • 70% of recorded sexual assaults took place in a residential location (e.g. a home).
  • 74% of victims knew the offender – and of those, just over half were non-family members (e.g. friends, ex-partners, teachers, acquaintances, colleagues).
  • It is estimated that 75% of sexual assaults are never reported – so these statistics are likely to be much higher.
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Recorded Crime – Victims, Australia, 2017.

 

Experiences of specific groups of people Women and girls:

  • In 2017, women and girls made up 83% of victims of recorded sexual assaults in Queensland.
  • Half of those women were between 10 and 19 years of age.
  • In Australia, 1 in 6 women report that they have been physically and/or sexually abused before the age of 15.
Sources: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Personal Safety Survey 2016 & Recorded Crime – Victims, Australia, 2017.

 

Men and boys:

  • In 2017, men and boys made up 17% of victims of recorded sexual assaults in Queensland.
  • Of those men and boys, just over half were under the age of 14.
  • 1 in 9 men report that they have been physically and/or sexually abused before the age of 15.
  • In 2016-17 in Queensland, 95% of recorded sexual offences were committed by men.
  • Males aged 15 to 19 committed the largest amount of offences compared to all other age groups.
Sources: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Personal Safety Survey 2016 & Recorded Crime – Victims, Australia, 2017; Queensland Police Service, Annual Statistical Review 2016-17.

 

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 3 times more likely to experience sexual assault than non-Indigenous Australians.
  • 12% of victims of recorded sexual assault in Queensland are Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander, despite making up only 4% of the population.
Sources: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Personal Safety Survey 2016 & Recorded Crime – Victims, Australia, 2017.

People with disability:

  • A 2007 study found that over a quarter of victims of sexual assault had a psychiatric or intellectual disability, despite making up just 3% of the population.
Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia, 2018.

 

Women from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds:

  • While statistics are not readily available, services estimate the vast majority of women from a migrant and refugee background have experienced sexual assault.
Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia, 2018.

 

LGBTIQA+ people:

  • While statistics are not readily available, while there is more research to be done, one study found that 25% experienced sexual assault within a same-sex relationship, despite representing around 11% of the population.

 

Community attitudes:

  • Although attitudes are improving, our society still has some concerning views about relationships and sexual violence:
  • Up to 15% of people think it’s justified for a man to force a woman to have sex if she kisses him first.
  • 1 in 10 people think that if a woman falls asleep during sex, it’s understandable if a man keeps having sex with her anyway.
  • Nearly 1 in 3 people believe that if a woman sends a nude image to her partner, she is partially responsible if he shares it without permission.
  • Nearly half of Australians think it is common for sexual assault accusations to be used as a way of getting back at men.
Source: Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety, National Community Attitudes towards Violence Against Women 2017

Sexual Violence in Queensland and Australia – Key Facts: download PDF
Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women